The drastic jump in asylum numbers from the Ukraine and further afield has put the kibosh on idealistic plans to phase out Direct Provision, according to snooping by the Business Post.

Long sought after and greenlighted in the Programme for Government, the post-Direct Provision roadmap envisioned 6 custom built reception centres housing 2,000 asylum seekers temporarily before the state can procure for them own door accommodation within 3 months.

Originally a stopgap measure introduced in 2000 for largely failed asylum seekers, Direct Provision has drawn criticism for its inordinate amount of fraud and enrichment of certain financial interests in the placement of asylum centres.

With an initial White Paper welcomed by the usual suspects in the pro-migration lobby, the plans precipitated some stark warnings from the Department of Housing as well as general departmental disquiet about the impact such a move would have on society and the housing market.

A cornerstone of Roderic O’Gorman’s tenure at the Department of Children, the Business Post reports that plans to phase out Direct Provision by 2024 were blasted by the sudden strain as well as a specific programme by the Housing Agency to source accommodation hitting a wall.

With just 17 homes built to cater for moving international protection applicants out of Direct Provision so far, a Department spokesman confirmed that an internal committee will return a verdict on future dates for the end of September.

The move came with a certain level of understanding from pro-migration advocacy groups such as the Irish Refugee Council conscious of the unfurling anarchy in the asylum industry.

Sources within the government report however that the state is using the crisis to prepare for the long term dismantling of the Direct Provision system, especially in lessons learnt in the management of the Citywest centre.

Facing some awkward questions upon the commencement of the new college year and the directing away of student accommodation to feed the asylum beast, don’t expect this issue to vanish anytime soon.

Besieged at every angle, the 44,000 Ukrainian arrivals coincides with a ratcheting up of regular asylum claims (7,000 since January) which has put the system on its back.

The powers that be have talked themselves into a corner on the Direct Provision issue and potentially a low-level humanitarian crisis at that. The asylum issue could be hidden away from the public gaze for the best part of two decades but is slowly rupturing onto our streets, parishes and cities as the idealism of fools clashes with reality.

Posted by Ciaran Brennan

3 Comments

  1. So long as the govt refuses to deport those whose asylum claims have failed , the system will be a mess . If the Brits announce any new ” Rwanda style deals ” with third countries , expect Ireland to receive 1,500 non Ukranian asylum applications ( plus dependants ) per week ( indefinitely ) . How do you deport those who arrive with no i d ? For all intents & purposes the Birthright citizenship referendum result has been ignored – everyone who wants to remain does so . The asylum system will collapse , unless we follow the Brits & set up reception centres in far flung spots #Angola

    Reply

  2. Charles simmonds 13/08/2022 at 8:25 am

    “the idealism of fools”. perfect!

    Reply

  3. Ivaus@thetricolour 15/08/2022 at 4:51 am

    …and by continually creating one crisis after another, Crisis after Crisis,
    THEY create for THEMselves the opportunities to Abolish or Postpone,
    defer or delay ANY Programs,Plans or Promises Peddled to Paddy Public…Politics and Political Posturing the name of the game,by THEM.

    It is a disgustingly disgraceful experience for all Irish People, in this decade of centenary celebrations,to our Patriotic Ancestors, that we endure the absolute Foolishness and Stupidity of these scumbags that inherited FREEDOM FROM FOREFATHERS…while they piddle n play in the Plastic Paddyfield of Political Pawn Brokering.Parasitic Peasantry.

    Reply

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